Bone Broth

I’ve already mentioned in Feeding hungry kids (and husbands) that a popular food in our house has been ready made soups from the chiller section of the supermarket.  I used to have a bowl of soup nearly every lunchtime. These were a life saver when I was too weak to cook.  However, now I’m improving I am managing to make more home made stocks and soups, although I still make use of ready made soups when I’ve run out of home made and I’m low on energy. I’ve been reading a lot about the benefits of bone broth.  It seems to be a bit of a super food.  Here’s some of the claims:

  • helps heal the gut
  • increase immunity
  • reduce joint pain in athletes
  • may improve sleep quality
  • helps the liver with detoxification
  • it’s a good source of magnesium, which I’ve found helpful in reducing restless legs and leg pain

If you want to research this further there here are some articles I found helpful:

As a CFS sufferer bone broth sounds like something I should be eating more of. I like the idea of perpetual soup.  I may try this next week and see how I get on.  I’m not sure my family will take kindly to drinking broth, but I will try it. I have made a couple of batches of chicken stock recently. I’ve used it in home made soups and various slow cooker recipes.  I still have a litre or so left in my freezer which I’m going to use in some leek and potato soup. Here’s how I make chicken stock: Ingredients

  • The remains of a chicken (carcass, skin etc.)
  • 1-2 bay leaves
  • 1-2 carrots
  • 1-2 celery sticks
  • 1 onion – peeled and halved
  • 3 peppercorns
  • celtic sea salt
  • herbs – usually thyme or rosemary (fresh or dried)

Put chicken carcass, skin and any other bits left when we’ve eaten the chicken into the slow cooker.  Add the other ingredients, cover with water to the capacity of the slow cooker.  Cook for approx 8 hours. Cool and drain the stock.  Keep in the fridge for approx 5 days or in the freezer for longer.

3 responses to “Bone Broth

  1. Once you have completed your first long boil, take the carcass out, re roast it and then crack the bones to release the marrow and boil again ! It goes even further then and you get even more stock. Learnt this trick in China!

    • Thanks Helen. I’ll try that next time. I have made some beef broth, but it was not a success: the rest of the family will not touch it, and I read good stock should be gelatinous when cold and mine was not. I will have another try with a double roast and boil before I decide whether to abandon beef broth and stick to chicken.

  2. Pingback: Sweet potato and Lentil Stew | Eat 4 ME

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